United Kingdom (Main Line)

The Tiarapedia: United Kingdom (Main Line)

Below is a list of the tiaras worn by the women of the main line of the British royal family. Click on the title of the tiara to be taken to pages with fuller histories, images, and much more information. Enjoy!

(PLEASE NOTE: The text and images on this website MAY NOT be reproduced for any reason without the written permission of the writer.)

The Aquamarine Pineflower Tiara: Four diamond and aquamarine pine cone elements, interspersed by rectangular, emerald-cut aquamarines, set atop a diamond and aquamarine base. Commissioned from Cartier in 1940 by King George VI as an anniversary present for Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother. Given to the Princess Royal as a wedding present in 1973 and later modified. Worn by Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother and the Princess Royal.

The Belgian Sapphire Tiara: A large lozenge-shaped sapphire, surrounded by diamonds and topped by a trio of upright diamond and sapphire elements, flanked on either side by additional diamond and sapphire swags and cluster/upright elements, placed on a diamond base. Made in the nineteenth-century as a necklace and worn by Princess Louise of Belgium. Acquired in 1963 by Queen Elizabeth II and placed on a tiara frame. Worn by Queen Elizabeth II.

The Brazilian Aquamarine Tiara: Large, emerald-cut aquamarines, surrounded by diamonds, interspersed by diamond and aquamarine fan elements, all situated on a diamond and aquamarine bandeau base. Made in 1957 by Garrard to coordinate with aquamarine pieces presented by the people of Brazil to Queen Elizabeth II. Remodeled by the same firm in 1971. Worn by Queen Elizabeth II.

The Burmese Ruby Tiara: Tudor-style roses set with diamonds and rubies, interspersed by diamonds, set on a simple diamond base. Made by Garrard in 1973 using 96 rubies presented to Queen Elizabeth II as a wedding gift in 1947 and diamonds from the dismantled Nizam of Hyderabad Tiara. Worn by Queen Elizabeth II.

The Canadian Aquamarine Tiara: Five aquamarines surrounded by diamond ribbon elements. Worn for the first time in public during Queen Elizabeth II's 1970 visit to Canada. Worn by Queen Elizabeth II and the Countess of Wessex.

The Cartier Bracelet Bandeau: Three Art Deco bracelets from a set of five (two all-diamond, one diamond and sapphire, one diamond and ruby, and one diamond and emerald) attached to a bandeau frame with diamond-set ends. Made in the 1920s by Cartier. Purchased by King George VI for Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother. Inherited by Queen Elizabeth II in 2002 (and worn only as bracelets). Worn as a tiara by Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother.


The Cartier Halo Tiara (Cole Bennetts/Getty Images)

The Cartier Halo Tiara: Diamond scroll elements arranged across a geometric band of diamonds. Made by Cartier in 1936. Given as an anniversary present to Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother by King George VI. Given to Queen Elizabeth II as an eighteenth-birthday present in 1944. Worn by Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, Princess Margaret, the Princess Royal, and the Duchess of Cambridge. Worn as a wedding tiara by the Duchess of Cambridge (2011).

The Cubitt Tiara: An all-diamond tiara featuring flower and leaf motifs, rising to a tall central floral element. Worn by Sonia Cubitt, the Duchess of Cornwall, and Laura Lopes. Worn as a wedding tiara by the Duchess of Cornwall (1973) and Laura Lopes (2006).


The Delhi Durbar Tiara (Bethany Clarke/Getty Images)

The Delhi Durbar Tiara: A large, elaborate diamond coronet featuring scroll, festoon, and cluster designs. Commissioned in 1911 from Garrard by Queen Mary for the coronation durbar in Delhi. Made using diamonds from the dismantled Boucheron Loop Tiara and pear-shaped cabochons from the Cambridge emerald collection. Also originally designed to be worn with the Cullinan III and Cullinan IV diamonds. Offered to Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother as a permanent loan in 1946. Inherited by Queen Elizabeth II in 2002. Offered as a loan to the Duchess of Cornwall in 2005. Worn by Queen Mary, Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, and the Duchess of Cornwall.

The Double Meander Tiara: A tall, interlocking double row of diamond meander elements, originally topped by a diamond aigrette that could be worn with an ostrich feather. Made in the late nineteenth century. Acquired by Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother. Worn by the Princess Royal.


The George IV Diamond Diadem (Bethany Clarke/Getty Images)

The George IV Diamond Diadem: A large diamond and pearl crown topped with alternating cross pattée and floral elements. Made by Rundell, Bridge, and Rundell in 1820 for the coronation of King George IV. Subsequently altered for the coronations of Queen Victoria (1838), Queen Alexandra (1902), and Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother (1937). Worn by King George IV (on his coronation day, with a velvet cap), Queen Adelaide, Queen Victoria, Queen Alexandra, Queen Mary, and Queen Elizabeth II.


The Girls of Great Britain and Ireland Tiara (SHAUN CURRY/AFP/Getty Images)

The Girls of Great Britain and Ireland Tiara: Diamond fleur-de-lis and festoon elements set atop a substantial diamond base, originally topped by pear-shaped pearls and convertible for wear as a coronet and as a necklace. Made by Garrard in 1893. Presented to Queen Mary as a wedding gift by a committee of women led by Lady Eva Greville. Pearls replaced by diamond brilliants in 1914 by Garrard. Given to Queen Elizabeth II as a wedding present in 1947. Worn by Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth II.

The Greville Tiara: Trios of diamond brilliants set in a honeycomb-style diamond frame, topped by clusters of brilliants and a central marquise-cut diamond. Made in 1921 by Boucheron for Mrs. Ronnie Greville. Bequeathed to Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother in 1942. Altered by Cartier in 1953. Inherited by Queen Elizabeth II in 2002. Offered as a loan to the Duchess of Cornwall in 2005. Worn by Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother and the Duchess of Cornwall.

The Lotus Flower Tiara: A bandeau of lotus flower (or papyrus) elements in diamonds, topped by round pearls. Made in 1923 by Garrard for Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, using diamonds and pearls from a dismantled necklace given to her as a wedding present by King George VI. Worn by Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, Princess Margaret, the Countess of Snowdon, and the Duchess of Cambridge. Worn as a wedding tiara by the Countess of Snowdon (1993).

The Nizam of Hyderabad Tiara: A diamond floral tiara featuring three removable rose elements that could be worn as brooches. Made by Cartier and given, along with a matching necklace, to Queen Elizabeth II as a wedding gift in 1947 by the Nizam of Hyderabad. Dismantled in 1973, with the rose brooches preserved. Diamonds reused in the creation of the Burmese Ruby Tiara. Worn by Queen Elizabeth II.

The Oriental Circlet: A near-circlet of Mughal arches, inspired by Indian jewelry on display at the Great Exhibition of 1851, set with diamonds and rubies. Made for Queen by Garrard in 1853, based on a design by Prince Albert. Originally a complete circlet set with diamonds and opals. Remodeled in 1858 to remove diamonds lost in the Hanoverian claim, leaving space open at the back of the tiara. Opals replaced by rubies during a remodel ordered by Queen Alexandra in 1902.  Designated an heirloom of the crown by Queen Victoria in 1901. Worn by Queen Victoria, Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, and Queen Elizabeth II.

The Persian Turquoise Tiara: A diamond and turquoise tiara (originally a kokoshnik, and sometimes called the "Triumph of Love Tiara") featuring numerous love symbols, including torches, lover's knots, and laurel wreaths. Purchased by Queen Mary from Garrard. Given to Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother in 1923 by King George V. Subsequently remodeled to remove the top row of diamonds. Worn by Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother and Princess Margaret.

The Plunket Tiara: A diamond floral tiara featuring shamrock motifs. Owned by the Plunket family. Borrowed for a single occasion in 1973 by Queen Elizabeth II.


The Poltimore Tiara (Scott Barbour/Getty Images)

The Poltimore Tiara: An imposing, tall tiara of diamond scrolls, clusters, and floral elements, convertible for wear as a necklace or as a set of eleven brooches. Made by Garrard in 1870 for Florence, Lady Poltimore. Purchased by Princess Margaret in 1959. Sold at auction in 2006. Worn by Florence, Lady Poltimore, Margaret, Lady Poltimore, and Princess Margaret. Worn as a wedding tiara by Princess Margaret (1960).

Princess Andrew's Meander Tiara: A diamond bandeau that features meander, honeysuckle, and laurel wreath motifs in its design. Possibly made in France in the early twentieth century. Given by Princess Andrew of Greece and Denmark to Queen Elizabeth II as a wedding present in 1947. Given to the Princess Royal by Queen Elizabeth II in 1972. Worn by Princess Andrew of Greece and Denmark, the Princess Royal, and Zara Tindall. Worn as a wedding tiara by Zara Tindall (2011).

Princess Anne's Birthday Portrait Tiara: A delicate diamond scroll tiara of unknown provenance and ownership. Worn by the Princess Royal for a set of twenty-first birthday portrait photographs in 1971.

Princess Anne's Festoon Tiara: Diamond festoons underpinning seven upright diamond floral elements on an unadorned frame. Given to the Princess Royal in 1973 by the World-Wide Shipping Group after she christened one of their ships. Worn by the Princess Royal and Autumn Phillips. Worn as a wedding tiara by Autumn Phillips (2008).

Princess Anne's Pearl Bandeau: A low-profile tiara of unknown provenance that appears to be set with large round pearls. Worn by the Princess Royal.

Queen Adelaide's Diamond Fringe: A traditional diamond fringe made of interspersed bars and spikes, originally made to be worn as a necklace but sometimes converted for wear as a tiara. Made in 1831 for Queen Adelaide by Rundell and Bridge, using diamonds that belonged to King George III. Designated as an heirloom of the crown by Queen Victoria in 1901. Converted for use as a necklace for Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother in 1936, and remains in that setting today. Worn as a tiara by Queen Victoria and Queen Mary.

Queen Alexandra's Kokoshnik: A solid fringe tiara made of individual pavé-set diamond bars, which are rounded at the tips, originally convertible for wear as a necklace. Made by Garrard in 1888, inspired by a tiara owned by Empress Marie Feodorovna of Russia. Presented to the empress's sister, Queen Alexandra, as a silver wedding anniversary present by a committee of women, the Ladies of Society. A new self-adjusting frame provided by Garrard in 1895. Inherited by Queen Mary in 1925. Inherited by Queen Elizabeth II in 1953. Worn by Queen Alexandra, Queen Louise of Denmark, Queen Mary, and Queen Elizabeth II.


Queen Mary's Diamond Bandeau (Royal Collection Trust via Getty Images)

Queen Mary's Diamond Bandeau: A flexible Art Deco-style bandeau tiara of diamonds set in eleven sections, pierced with interlaced ovals, featuring two floral clusters on either side and the County of Lincoln Brooch in the center. Made in 1932 by Garrard for Queen Mary and designed to accommodate the central brooch, which was one of Queen Mary's wedding gifts and dates to 1893. Bequeathed to Queen Elizabeth II in 1953. Worn by Queen Mary and the Duchess of Sussex. Worn as a wedding tiara by the Duchess of Sussex (2018).

Queen Mary's Diamond Lozenge Tiara: A low-profile diamond bandeau featuring lozenge patterns in its setting, able to be worn with or without a set of round pearl toppers. Worn by Queen Mary and Princess Margaret.

Queen Mary's Fringe Tiara: A classic, balanced diamond fringe tiara. Ordered by Queen Mary in 1919 from Garrard as a modern alternative to Queen Adelaide's Diamond Fringe. Given to Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother in 1936. Inherited by Queen Elizabeth II in 2002. Worn by Queen Mary, Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, Queen Elizabeth II, and the Princess Royal. Worn as a wedding tiara by Queen Elizabeth II (1947) and the Princess Royal (1973).

Queen Mary's Lover's Knot Tiara: A tiara of diamond swags and lover's knots from which pear-shaped pearls are suspended. Made in 1913 by Garrard for Queen Mary as a copy of another family tiara, the Cambridge Lover's Knot Tiara. Originally featured a series of upright pearls, which were later removed. Inherited by Queen Elizabeth II in 1953. Offered as a long-term loan to Diana, Princess of Wales in 1981, and returned to the palace following her divorce and death. Worn by Queen Mary, Queen Elizabeth II, Diana, Princess of Wales, and the Duchess of Cambridge.

Queen Mary's Russian Bandeau: A flexible diamond bandeau with separate sections, featuring a sunray motif in its design, able to be worn with various central elements, including sapphire and emerald brooches. Said possibly to have once been the property of Empress Marie Feodorovna of Russia; reportedly purchased by Queen Mary at auction in Paris in 1921. Worn by Queen Mary and Princess Margaret.

The Strathmore Rose Tiara: Five classic English roses in diamonds, interspersed with diamond leaves, decorate the top of this simple tiara, which can be worn with either diamonds or sapphires in the center of each rose. The roses are detachable for wear as brooches; a second frame exists to allow the tiara to be worn low across the forehead. Made in England in the late nineteenth century. Purchased from Catchpole and Williams in 1923 by the Earl of Strathmore as a wedding present for Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother. Inherited by Queen Elizabeth II in 2002. Worn by Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother.

The Teck Crescent Tiara: A bandeau of twenty diamond crescents and three diamond roses, set atop a slender diamond base, sometimes supplemented by a pair of diamond rivieres. Made using diamond elements inherited by Princess Mary Adelaide, Duchess of Teck from her aunt, Princess Mary, Duchess of Gloucester, in 1857. New frame constructed for the tiara in 1901. Passed from Queen Mary to Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, and then inherited by Queen Elizabeth II in 2002. Offered as a long-term loan to the Duchess of Cornwall in 2005. Worn by Princess Mary Adelaide, Duchess of Teck, Margaret, Marchioness of Cambridge, and Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother.

The Teck Hoop Necklace Tiara: A necklace of diamond circles or hoops, occasionally worn set on a tiara frame. Reportedly made in the 1860s for Princess Mary Adelaide, Duchess of Teck. Passed from Queen Mary to Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, and then to Princess Margaret. Presently owned by the Earl of Snowdon. Worn as a tiara by Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother.


The Vladimir Tiara (Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)

The Vladimir Tiara: A tiara of interlocking diamond circles topped by a diamond ribbon design, set on a simple diamond base, able to be worn with or without pear-shaped pearl pendants. Attributed to Bolin, and likely made around 1874, at the time of the marriage of Marie of Mecklenburg-Schwerin to Grand Duke Vladimir Alexandrovich of Russia. Smuggled out of Russia by a British diplomat in 1917. Inherited by Princess Nicholas of Greece and Denmark in 1920. Purchased by Queen Mary in 1921. Adjusted in 1924 by Garrard to accommodate cabochon drops from the Cambridge emerald collection. Inherited by Queen Elizabeth II in 1953. Frame completely rebuilt by Garrard in 1988. Worn by Grand Duchess Vladimir, Queen Mary, and Queen Elizabeth II.

The Wessex Aquamarine Necklace Tiara: A modern tiara of geometric diamond scrolls surrounding a large sea-green aquamarine, convertible for wear as a necklace. Attributed to Collins and Sons. Worn by the Countess of Wessex.

The Wessex Wedding Tiara: A tiara made of four diamond anthemion elements placed on a simple gold frame. The anthemion elements may have been sourced from Queen Victoria's now-dismantled Regal Circlet. Assembled in 1999. Worn by the Countess of Wessex. Worn as a wedding tiara by the Countess of Wessex (1999).