03 April 2020

Tiaras at Sotheby's

Sotheby's

As we all shift to spending more time together online, Sotheby's is putting on one of their fantastic virtual jewelry auctions! In March, we previewed a few pieces from the sale, which was originally scheduled to be held in London, and today, I've got a look at the tiaras up for grabs.



Sotheby's


Lot #242 in the auction is this fascinating diamond floral tiara. The piece is a transformed corsage ornament from the end of the Victorian era, which has been mounted on a frame for wear as a tiara. The notes describe the ornament as "an articulated spray of wildflowers set with cushion-shaped and rose diamonds, two flowers mounted en tremblant." Even more intriguing: the piece is being offered by an unnamed "European ducal family."


Sotheby's


This piece has already received a lot of love from bidders, and it's easy to see why. It's a classic necklace/tiara conversion, similar to the one owned by Crown Princess Mary of Denmark. This tiara, being offered by an unnamed "German noble family," features "foliate open work design connected by knife edge bars, set with circular-cut diamonds and natural pearls.


Sotheby's

Here's a look at the piece in its necklace form. It's such a classic workhorse piece, perfectly suited for anyone who regularly attends a range of gala functions. (Royals, I'm looking at you!)


Sotheby's


"A lady" is selling this intriguing convertible tiara, which sort of gives me Mellerio Shell Tiara vibes. It's a small tiara, made in France at the turn of the 20th century, that can be converted for wear as a bracelet. The notes describe it as having a "front section of sunburst design, with alternating lanceolated and lily-of-the-valley motifs, set with rose diamonds, above a detachable line bracelet of cushion-shaped diamonds set in box links."


Sotheby's


Finally, there's this super-interesting diamond tiara, which we featured briefly in our earlier post. An unnamed "lady" is selling this piece, which would be a very early tiara example if it does indeed date to 1790, as the lot notes state.


Sotheby's

The lot notes don't offer us much else on the piece, save that it's "of scrolling design, set with rose diamonds in closed settings." We also learn that it's not signed (so we don't know the maker) and is in "overall good condition." I find the piece so fascinating, and I'm disappointed we don't have more information on its provenance!


Sotheby's

One of the cool things about the online auction is that you can watch it happening in real time. Bids close on April 7, and you can track the bidding online! There's a whole lot more fantastic stuff in the sale as well -- including that fantastic turquoise suite we discussed before! Here's a link to the entire online catalogue. Which pieces are you interested in?