18 April 2018

Even More Cartier Jewels in Canberra

Photo generously shared by Javier. DO NOT REPRODUCE.

Last week, we took a tour of some of the Cartier tiaras currently on show in Canberra courtesy the photos generously shared by lovely reader DeluxeDuck. (If you missed that post, it's over here!) Today, we've got another post full of DD's glittering photos, showcasing some of the other jewels on display in the exhibition. Enjoy!




Photo generously shared by Javier. DO NOT REPRODUCE.

The magnificent diamond and pearl devant de corsage that belonged to Dame Nellie Melba is one of the centerpieces of the exhibition. (You can read more about the jewel in this excellent recent article from the Australian!) The stomacher, now converted to be worn as a necklace, was loaned to the exhibition by Lord and Lady Vestey; Lord Vestey is Melba's great-grandson. (And Lady Vestey is one of Prince Harry's godmothers!)


Photo generously shared by Javier. DO NOT REPRODUCE.

The luminous Hutton-Mdivani Necklace is also on display. The jadeite necklace belonged to the famous heiress Barbara Hutton; it was sold at Sotheby's in Hong Kong in 2014 for the world-record sum of $27 million! (You can read the lot notes from the auction here.)


Photo generously shared by Javier. DO NOT REPRODUCE.

And you'll certainly recognize this stunning sapphire, which was owned by several royal women, including Queen Marie of Romania and Queen Friederike of Greece. (Here's our article about Queen Marie and the pendant, and here's our article about Queen Friederike's use of the jewel.)


Photo generously shared by Javier. DO NOT REPRODUCE.

Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom has loaned several pieces of jewelry to the exhibition, including some of her wedding gifts. This piece, the Nizam of Hyderabad Necklace, was one of those presents; it was most recently worn by the Duchess of Cambridge. (Read more about Kate's use of the necklace here!)


Photo generously shared by Javier. DO NOT REPRODUCE.

The incredible Williamson Diamond Brooch is also on display; it features one of the rarest pink diamonds in the world. (A few years ago, I proclaimed this piece to be the Queen's most important legacy addition to the Windsor vaults; read more about that list over here!)


Photo generously shared by Javier. DO NOT REPRODUCE.

The Williamson Brooch is placed beside Princess Margaret's Cartier Diamond Rose Brooch, one of her most important personal jewels. Worn for the 1953 coronation, the brooch was an important symbol for Margaret, whose middle name was Rose. The brooch was sold at the 2006 Christie's auction of her jewels, fetching more than 150,000 pounds; you can read the lot notes here!


Photo generously shared by Javier. DO NOT REPRODUCE.

Two of Cartier's most famous royal customers were the Duke and Duchess of Windsor. This stunning diamond and onyx panther bracelet was acquired by Wallis in 1952. In 2010, the bracelet sold at a Sotheby's auction for more than $7 million; more on that sale here!


Photo generously shared by Javier. DO NOT REPRODUCE.

Along with the panther bracelet, several more of Wallis's Cartier jewels are on display in Canberra. The display includes her beautiful amethyst, turquoise, diamond, and gold bib necklace. (See our feature on that necklace and its accompanying bracelet over here!)


Photo generously shared by Javier. DO NOT REPRODUCE.

Another famous royal Cartier customer, Princess Grace of Monaco, is also well-represented. Her tremendous Diamond Festoon Necklace is featured prominently. (Read our article on the necklace here!)


Photo generously shared by Javier. DO NOT REPRODUCE.

Here's a look at the larger display of Monegasque jewels, including Grace's Bains de Mer Tiara and the pearl drop tiara that belonged to her mother-in-law, the Duchess of Valentinois. The diamond poodle brooch, made by Cartier in 1958, was a tribute to her beloved pup, Oliver.


Photo generously shared by Javier. DO NOT REPRODUCE.

And I'll leave you with another view of the incredible reconstructed Patiala Necklace, which we discussed in an earlier feature over here. Spectacular!